About English East Coast paintings
Edward Williams (1782-1855), Near Yarmouth Roads. A glorious ‘moonlight’, worthy of John Crome or his son  John Berney Crome, and a classic ‘Norwich School’ Painting, even though Williams himself wasn’t an East Anglia artist.

Edward Williams (1782-1855), Near Yarmouth Roads. A glorious ‘moonlight’, worthy of John Crome or his son  John Berney Crome, and a classic ‘Norwich School’ Painting, even though Williams himself wasn’t an East Anglia artist.

WHAT MAKES YOU FEEL BETTER WHEN YOU ARE IN A BAD MOOD?

Family, music, sunshine…and good paintings!xxx

Edward Robert Smythe, a fisherman’s family awaiting his safe return at Pakefield, Suffolk.

Edward Robert Smythe, a fisherman’s family awaiting his safe return at Pakefield, Suffolk.

Thomas Smythe (1825-1906), Edward Smythe’s brother, watercolour of Shotley Beach looking towards Harwich.

Thomas Smythe (1825-1906), Edward Smythe’s brother, watercolour of Shotley Beach looking towards Harwich.

Edward Robert Smythe (1810-99), Ipswich painter, Felixtowe, Suffolk. 

Edward Robert Smythe (1810-99), Ipswich painter, Felixtowe, Suffolk. 

Ron Holmes (b. 1945), Blackwater Creek, Essex.

Ron Holmes (b. 1945), Blackwater Creek, Essex.

J.M.W.Turner, Sunrise at Margate, watercolour sketch late 1830s.

J.M.W.Turner, Sunrise at Margate, watercolour sketch late 1830s.

J.M.W.Turner (1775-1851), Margate, Kent. Turner spent a considerable amount of time sketching and painting this part of the Kent coast.

J.M.W.Turner (1775-1851), Margate, Kent. Turner spent a considerable amount of time sketching and painting this part of the Kent coast.

Thomas Smythe (1825-1906), Ipswich painter, brother of the prolific painter Edward Robert Smythe (1810-99). This is a simply breathtaking oil sketch of Dunwich beach, Suffolk. Dunwich, now a village, is the ghost city of the English east coast: formerly, some 15 centuries ago, the proud capital of East Anglia, it has been inexorably devoured by coastal erosion. William Camden, in his Britannia (1607), translated by Philemon Holland, says of the town’s decay: ‘But now by a certaine peculiar spite and envie of Nature , that suffereth the greedy sea to have what it will and encroch still without all end, the greatest part thereof is violently carried away with the waves, and by reason that the Bishops many yeares agoe translated their seat to another place, it lieth (as it were) desolate’. 

Thomas Smythe (1825-1906), Ipswich painter, brother of the prolific painter Edward Robert Smythe (1810-99). This is a simply breathtaking oil sketch of Dunwich beach, Suffolk. Dunwich, now a village, is the ghost city of the English east coast: formerly, some 15 centuries ago, the proud capital of East Anglia, it has been inexorably devoured by coastal erosion. William Camden, in his Britannia (1607), translated by Philemon Holland, says of the town’s decay: But now by a certaine peculiar spite and envie of Nature , that suffereth the greedy sea to have what it will and encroch still without all end, the greatest part thereof is violently carried away with the waves, and by reason that the Bishops many yeares agoe translated their seat to another place, it lieth (as it were) desolate’. 

Quayside. A typically detailed and beautifully rendered John Sell Cotman (1782-1842) watercolour.

Quayside. A typically detailed and beautifully rendered John Sell Cotman (1782-1842) watercolour.